Rose Dove Dalton and Albert Lee Dalton Homeplace

Rose Dove Dalton and Albert Lee Dalton Homeplace
This house and property belonged to John Ward, Jr At his death he willed the property to his nephew William Ward

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Our Dear Sweetheart

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Today we lost our dear Jasmine.  She was sweetest best dog ever.  We were so lucky she found us 12 years ago tomorrow.  We wll miss her every day. 

July 28, 2010

Location of Jamestown, VirginiaImage via Wikipedia

2nd proof for Walter Chiles
Headright System
This system was used in Jamestown, Virginia starting in 1618 as an attempt to solve labor shortages due to the advent of the tobacco economy, which required large plots of land with many workers.  It was also a way to attract immigrants.  Virginian colonists were each given two headrights, immigrant colonists who paid their passage were given one headright, and individuals would receive one headright each time they paid for the passage of another individual.    A headright equaled 50 acres.
Walter Chiles paid for himself and the immigrants below to come to Virginia.
 Note that they have Walter Chiles jr. and sr.  
Also, there was one name that was listed twice (John Gerry).  Could be father and son.
Book:  Early Virginia Immigrants 1623 to 1666
By Geoge Cabell Greer
Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc. 1978
Originally Published:  Richmond, Virginia  1912

Below is the name of the person transported, year transported, where transported and the page in the book where I found their name.
Henry Fulton-1638- Charles City Co. Page 122
Walter Shaw - 1638 - Charles City Co. Page 295
Sarah Cole - 1638 - Charles City Co. Page 73
Walter Chiles Jr. - 1638- Charles City Co. Page 66
Eliza Chiles - 1638 - Charles City Co. Page 66
William Chiles - 1638 - Charles City Co. Page 66
Walter Chiles Sr. - 1638 - Charles City Co. Page 66
Henry Tutton - 1638- Charles City Co. Page 333
John Gerry - 1638 - Charles City Co.- Page 126
John Gerry - 1638 - Charles City Co.- Page 126
William Webb - 1642 - Charles County Page 348
Stephen Gerris - 1642 - Charles County Page 126
Jon Kimberlin - 1642- Charles County Page 193
Ann Potery- 1642 Charles County Page 263

A total of 14 people which includes Walter, Sr., which would come to about 700 acres.


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Tuesday, July 27, 2010

July 27 Walter Chiles

Bristol England 1636
Bristol was a merchant/seafaring town.  Its safe harbor made it second only to London as a port.  In the late medieval times cloth was the basis of Bristol's Trade.  Over the years the cloth textile industry spread out across the Avon into the new industrial suburb of Redcliffe.  The looms of weavers converted wool from the surrounding areas into cloth.  Fullers pounded it, dyers dipped it and it was hung out to dry on great racks.  Then the merchants set out to market it.  Their cloth was traded around England, but the truly ambitious set sail for parts unknown to market their goods, sale them, buy more goods and bring those goods back to England for sale.  A Merchant could possibly become a wealthy man, if he was willing to take the risk. The risk of pirates, storms and disease.  This was not an ordinary merchant.  This was the Merchant Adventurer.

Our Merchant Adventure is Walter Chiles.  In the High Court of Admiralty Examinations in England No. 301 dated July 24, 1637, Walter gives his age of 29 which would make his birth year approximately 1608 and his occupation was a cloth worker.

So at the age of 29, Walter Chiles sets out on an adventure to the New World as  the assistant to the Purser Henry Tutton on the ship the "Blessing".  Our intrepid cloth worker was seeking his fortune on the other side of the world.  Whether this was his first trip to Virginia or even his first trip on a ship we do not know,  but we do know this:  His age, his birth year of approximately 1608, his home is Bristol, his occupation-cloth worker and his new job, assistant purser to Henry Tutton on the Ship "Blessing".

For a young man with no title and no large wealth, this was his best opportunity.  That is, if you were courageous enough to take the chance.  He may have learned the cloth trade with the assistance of his father or by an apprenticeship which would have placed him in contact with merchants of the shipping trade.  How advantageous for an ambitious young man, to meet and make connections to further his career. As assistant to the purser, he was in charge of the supplies and merchandise on board the ship.  When arriving at their destination, they would sell the merchandise, bring back tobacco and other goods from the new world to sell. The owner of the ship would reap great rewards, but so would our young adventurer.

The information that we know for a fact is the following:
The Ship Blessing.  Owned by William Harris and Nicholas Jollye.  William Harris was probably the owner of the merchandise.
Captain:  Mr. Phillip Luxon  (drank most of the liquor on board causing a drop in sales and low morale on the ship.  There were desertions at Kinsale, Ireland and at Falmouth which caused her tobacco to be neglected and spoiled.
Cooper and Steward;  Phillip Callow of Bristol    20 years of age
Assistant to Purser:      Walter Childes of Briston  29 years of age
Purser:                         Henry Tatton of Bristol   21 years of age
Steward:                      John Marten

The ships company numbered 14 and she carried 2 to 3 passengers.
The ship "Blessing" remained in Virginia for 14 weeks which was probably during the year 1636.

There is a book English Adventurers and Emigrants, 1609-1660  Abstracts of Examinations, by Peter Wilson Coldham that provides all this information.


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July 27, 2010

This is a test as I am having trouble loading my information.

Sunday, July 25, 2010

video


We had a visit by our family last year and here  are  some of the pictures of  the excursion.

Friday, July 23, 2010

notes on adams ward cemetery

Notes on the information of Wards/Adams Cemetery
Robert A. Ward and George Edward Ward were the sixth and seventh children of John and Tabitha Ward. I attached their grave markers in the previous blogs. In the book Richmond, William and Timothy Terrell, Colonial Virginians, the date of their death is the same “February 16, 1834”. I read the marker for Robert Ward to say May 5, 1831. But it could have easily been 1834. If they both died in the year of 1834, could there have been an epidemic of cholera at that time.
If anyone has any information on this, I would appreciate a comment.
*************
Tabitha Hubbard Walden Ward
I found eight grave markers for her children. There was a grave marker for her husband, John Ward.
Her daughter- in-law Elizabeth M. Adams was buried there as was her father John Lynch Adams. At this time I do not know why John Lynch Adams was buried in the Ward/Adams cemetery. It may be that he wanted to be buried near Captain Robert Adams.
We know that Captain Robert Adams fell ill while visiting his sister Mildred Adams Ward and was buried there.
Tabitha’s granddaughter Laura Ward Stone was buried their along with her mother and father (Addison and Wilmouth Ward)
But noticeably absent is Tabitha, herself. I know that she lived until May 15, 1866. She was 76 years old. In the 1850 census, she was still running the home and she had two others living with her. The census listed a Tazewell Ward son of 21 years living with her. Alexander Tazewell Ward, her last child, didn’t marry until 1851 so that is probably him, but he would have been 23. The other person living with her at that time was Edwin at the age of 5. He was the son of Addison Whitfield Ward and Wilmouth Walden Adams. The age and name fit. Further note, he was killed in the Civil War at the age of eighteen. In the 1860 census, she is living alone, but is still running the plantation.
Tabitha was born in 1789 Virginia at the end of the revolutionary war. She married as a young woman and was widowed at the age of 49. She survived and lived through the War of 1812 and the Civil War. At least one of her children moved to Texas and probably fought in the Mexican War. Of her many grandchildren and great grandchildren, there were doctors, lawyers, soldiers, judges and pioneers of the American West. She was the matriarch of the family for over fifty years. How could she not be buried beside her husband? Either I missed her grave when we were photographing or maybe like Robert Adams, she was at someone’s home visiting and passed away. It would be sad to think that after all those years of surviving life, that she would be lost in death.
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notes on ward adams cemetery

Notes on the information of Wards/Adams Cemetery
Robert A. Ward and George Edward Ward were the sixth and seventh children of John and Tabitha Ward.  I attached their grave markers in the previous blogs.  In the book Richmond, William and Timothy Terrell, Colonial Virginians, the date of their death is the same “February 16, 1834”.  I  read the marker for Robert Ward to say May 5, 1831.  But it could have easily been 1834.  If they both died in the year of 1834, could there have been an epidemic of cholera at that time.
If anyone has any information on this, I would appreciate a comment.
*************
Tabitha Hubbard Walden Ward
I found eight grave markers for her children.  There was a grave marker for her husband, John Ward.
Her daughter- in-law Elizabeth M. Adams was buried there as was her father John Lynch Adams.   At this time I do not know why John Lynch Adams was buried in the Ward/Adams cemetery.  It may be that he wanted to be buried near Captain Robert Adams. 
We know that Captain Robert Adams fell  ill while visiting his sister Mildred Adams Ward and was buried there. 
Tabitha’s  granddaughter Laura Ward Stone was buried their along with her mother and father (Addison and Wilmouth Ward)
But noticeably absent is Tabitha, herself.  I know that she lived until May 15, 1866.  She was 76 years old.  In the 1850 census, she was still running the home and she had two others living with her.   The census listed a Tazewell Ward son of 21 years living with her.  Alexander Tazewell Ward, her last child, didn’t marry until 1851 so that is probably him, but he would have been 23.  The other person living with her at that time was Edwin at the age of 5.  He was the son of Addison Whitfield Ward and Wilmouth Walden Adams.  The age and name fit.  Further note, Edwin was killed in the Civil War at the age of eighteen.  In the 1860 census, she is living alone, but is still running the plantation.
Tabitha was born in 1789 Virginia at the end of the revolutionary war.  She married as a young woman  and was widowed at the age of 49.  She survived and lived through the War of 1812 and the Civil War.  At least one of her children moved to Texas and probably fought in the Mexican War.    Of her many grandchildren and great grandchildren, there were doctors, lawyers, soldiers, judges and pioneers of the American West.   She was the matriarch of the family for over fifty years.  How could she not be buried beside her husband?  Either I missed her grave when we were photographing or maybe like Robert Adams, she was at someone’s home visiting and passed away.   I hope to find her one day.  



Wednesday, July 21, 2010


George Edward Ward Born March, 1818. I couldn't make out the day. Died February 16, 1834.
Son of John and Tabitha Walden Ward
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Ward Adams Cemetery


Robert A. Ward son of John and Tabita Hubbard Walden Ward. According to Richmond, William and Timothy Terrell, Colonial Virginians, he died on February 16, 1834. But the marker says May 5, 1831.
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Wilmouth W Ward Daughter of John Lynch Adams and Martha Walden Adams. She was the sister of Elizabeth Mumford Adams.
Wilmouth Walden Adams married Addison Whitfield Ward son of John and Tabitha Ward. The writing was indecipherable in some areas. Her death date looks like 1849, but I can't be certain.
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July 21, 2010


Basically, for the last twenty years I searched real estate titles for a living.  In the beginning my work required that I travel from courthouse to courthouse searching for mortgages, judgments, financing statements and ownership of land parcels.  Some of the book’s entries were still being handwritten or typed.  I loved going to the different courthouses.  Most of the courthouses I visited in Virginia and Georgia were small with a family-like air.  Everyone knew everyone and it was wonderful. 
So much changed in the last 15 years and I don’t just mean going from book to typewriters to computers to logging onto your computer at home to access courthouse records.  I noticed that when I first started searching that the banks requested full title searches.  That means that I had to search the ownership of a piece of land for 60 years.  And in many cases, if I had searched the title for 60 years and the last deed I found was not a general warranty deed, I had to go back even further.  Sometimes I searched the title in one county and had to go to another to finish because the county had been cut off from another county. 
The majority of my work was coming out of subdivisions.  So eventually they start asking for the title just to start from the time of the development of the subdivision.  Then they started asking for only a two owner search and then eventually the one owner search.  These were especially for the people that were refinancing. 
I also noticed that for the majority of the landowners that I searched had only one mortgage and very rarely a judgment against the property and the taxes were almost always up to date.  We also checked judgments against a buyer of the property.   And for the most part, I never found anything against the buyers which I found normal considering that the bank orders the title search when the loan has been approved.  So how could the loan be approved, if the buyer had judgments against him.   Approximately eight or nine years ago, many title examiners started getting requests in which all the people had judgments against them and they were barely out of bankruptcy.  I would report them and, lo and behold, the loan still went through.  I told my husband at that time that my title searching days would soon be over.   I was helping close loans for different companies.  They were giving loans for 120% of the value of the property, the loans were adjustable, and many of the buyers had less than desirable credit.  It was only a matter of time.
Last, but not definitely the least, title examiners were popping up everywhere.  They were undercutting all the fees that were set up.  I had companies wanting me to do titles for less than $30.00.  Now most women have manicures and pedicures that take little over an hour and they pay $75.00.  We pay people to cut small lawns for $40.00 to 60.00.  They come in and cut my lawn and walk away in less than 45 minutes with $50.00 in their pocket.  These are the same people that want a title examiner to check for clouds of title on the property.  Probably the biggest investment of their life and they want to pay less than what they would pay to have their nails done.  So needless to say many of the old school title examiners that will not compromise and throw a title together are no longer in business.
So the bubble finally popped about three years ago and it came to a halt about two years ago.  I found business working on foreclosure titles, but even that slowed down. 
So now I am blogging about what I love best- reading and history.  I am not complaining about the computers either.  They are such wonderful tools.  Everyone can be at home, a library, a internet station and talk and share with anyone around the world.  Genealogist now can contact other countries and their records. There are books on kindle and google that are minimal in price.  You can search the books for reference of your family.  There are cemetery records, land and Will records.  I can’t wait until the day when I can access all the old courthouse records on the computer.   But I still will miss the days when I would drive through the countryside, step into those lovely record rooms and touch those handwritten documents.  I can still smell the paper.


Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery

Sacred to the Memory of Mildred Leftwich consort of Augustine Leftwich.

Beginning of Grave Marker says: Young Beautiful Unaltered
The Daughter of her indulgent parents
The pride of an affectionate husband
Beloved By All

Mildred Adams Ward Leftwich: Born September 21, 1806
Died May 21, 1829
Daughter of John and Tabitha Hubbard Walden Ward

She had only one child: Mildred Leftwich
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Sacred to the Memory of John Ward
Born 5 November 1775
Died August 2nd, 1838

Son of William Ward and Mildred Adams Ward.
John married Tabitha Hubbard Walden.
John was killed by a tree falling on him when he was having ground cleared. According to Campbell Chronicles and Family Sketches, he owned the home Edge Hill near Leesville.

Children: Mildred Adams Ward, Henry Chiles Ward, William Walker Ward, Charles W. Ward, John Ward, Jr. Robert Adams Ward, George Edward Ward, Dr. David Chiles Ward, Addison Whitfield Ward, Sally Wilmouth Ward, Lucy Elizabeth Ward, Alexander Tazewell Ward.
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Monday, July 19, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery


Captain Robert Adams born around 1750/54 died about 1790.
Married Mary Terrell daughter of Joel Terrell and Ann Lewis.
He lived at what used to be known as the old "Brook's Place" which now is the site for Altavista.

Appointed on the Commission for the Peace for Bedford County, Virginia, February 24, 1778
Qualified in March, 1778 and served until September, 1781
He served under his uncle Col. Charles Lynch along with James Callaway, at the lead mines, and was associated with him in suppressing Tories and malefactors, by the "Lynch Law". He was mentioned by name in the law passed by the General Assembly in 1781, exempting them from suits, and justifying the conduct of those who had protected this section of the state from the depredations of Tories and evil-doers, albeit by measures not strictly within the law.  An old song relating to their deeds is remembered as the following:
Hurrah for Colonel Lynch, Captain Bob, and Callaway,
They never turned a Tory loose until he shouted,
Liberty!
He was a member of the first Commission of the Peace for Campbell County on February 7, 1782.
He represented Campbell County in the House of Delegates in 1782-1783.
He was recommended for Sheriff in 1783, and again in 1787. He qualified to that office in July, 1787 and served until 1789.
The duties of Sheriff then included those of Tax Collector. Conditions were then unsettled and taxes hard to collect and he went security for his brother James and he became financially involved and was liable for $30,000. After his death all his property had to be sold to pay for his debts.
He died in 1790 of typhoid fever contracted while on a visit to his sister, Mildred Adams Ward, wife of William Ward . He was  buried in Pittsylvania County on Staunton River which is now known as the Ward Adams Cemetery.

His children: Charles Adams, William Adams, Joel Terrell Adams, Polly Adams, Robert Adams, John Lynch Adams, James Adams, George Adams, Christopher Adams, Penelope Adams.

Sources:
Richmond, William and Timothy Terrell Colonial Virginians
Henings Statutes at Large
Adams Biographical Genealogies
Howe's "Historical Collections of Virginia"
Campbell Chronicles and Family Sketches
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Friday, July 16, 2010


This tombstone isn't very easy to read, but with a little effort, I was able to figure out that this is William Ellen Walker Ward. He was the young twelve year old son of Elizabeth Mumford Adams and William Walker Ward. I found his death in the death records for Pittsylvania County. The Pittsylvania County Death Record listed William Walker Ward as a 12 year. There was no reason given for his death. Place of death: Old Woman's Creek. Person that reported his death was his mother Eliza Ward.
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Ward Adams Cemetery


Tombstone: Sacred to the Memory of Henry C Ward
Born January, 1808 (I couldn't make out the day)
Died in Charleston, SC 20 day February, 1835

I am assuming that this is just a memorial for Henry C. Ward. His grave is probably in S.C. He was the second child born to John Ward and Tabitha Hubbard Walden Ward. He married Sallie W. Cabell on March 17, 1831. They had one child John Cabell Ward.

According to Cabell and their kin by Alexander Brown page 546, Henry Ward died of consumption in Charleston, SC.  Henry Ward's wife Sally Winston Cabell  was the daughter of Dr. John J. Cabell.
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Thursday, July 15, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery


Elizabeth Mumford Adams was the daughter of Major John Lynch Adams and Martha Walden Adams. She married William Ward on November 9, 1836. According to the book Richmond, William and Timothy Terrell Colonial Virginians by Celeste Jane Terrell Barnhill, they were married on November 9, 1836, and I have an excerpt from the newspaper the Lynchburg Virginian stating the same. She was widowed after only eight years of marriage. Some say that he was killed while cutting down trees on the farm and others credit that death to William Ward's father, John Ward, see Campbell Chronicles and Family Sketches, by Ruth Hairston Early. But in any case, she was left a widow at the age of 37 with four children,(Cornelia, Henry Chiles, Robert Adams and William Ellen Walker, one of which was only a year and a half.  She outlived her husband and all of her children except for Henry Chiles Ward.  I believe that her life was a difficult one to say the least.  Widowed at 37, her son William Ellen Walker Ward dies at the age of 12 on December 26, 1855.  Her daughter Cornelia married Littleton Tazewell Walden and he died in a riding accident. Then her daughter marries George Dove and he was not a prize.  Her son Robert Adams Ward dies at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863.  Henry Chiles Ward is a soldier in the civil war and then is involved in a murder.  He never marries.  The only Grandchildren that she has are the children of Cornelia and George Dove.  And as I understand by the stories told about him, it was a nightmare.  But more about that later. 
For someone with so much tragedy in their life, it is exceptional that she lived as long as she did.  I can only hope that there was some joy in her life.  

Any information that anyone has about her life would be much appreciated.  Also I am looking for the gravesite of Littleton Tazewell Walden.
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Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery



William Walker Ward married Elizabeth Mumford Adams on November 9, 1836. The Reverend Mr. Burns performed the ceremony. They had four children. Cornelia Ward Walden Dove, Henry Chiles Ward, Robert Adams Ward, William Ellen Walker Ward. Cornelia was the only one to have children. She is buried at the Dove Cemetery.

William and Elizabeth were lst cousins. Elizabeth's mother was Martha Walden, sister of Tabitha Walden Ward.
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Winchester Dalton

57th Infantry  Regiment  Virginia 
Company  D  The Galveston Tigers

May 24, 1861 Virginia officially succeeded from the Union.  All the men below travelled to Gum Springs to enlist in the Confederacy on Saturday, June 22, 1861.    The 57th Infantry Regiment was not organized until September 23, 1861. 

I searched the census records for Virginia in 1860 and I found that with the exception of Caleb Dalton* that most of these men came from the Northern District, Pittsylvania County, Virginia (Chatham, Berger’s Station and Chalk Level).   It is also possible that some of these names are extremely common and that the names I found in the census just happened to be the same as in this list.  But in any case, I am assuming that these young men all travelled at the same time or close to the same time to enlist due to their zeal for the cause.  It may be my imagination at work, but I can see them all there, discussing the quick end to the war and the beating that they would give the Northerners.   Maybe some of them rode in together and ate together, talking about the crops they were growing and the girls they were seeing, not knowing of the horrors that would be endured in the years to come.

1.        Enos Barber  Enlisted as a Private- Discharged from Company D, 57th Infantry Regiment Virginia on September 5, 1862
2.       Caleb Dalton  Enlisted as a Private- Died Company D, 57th Regiment Virginia on August 10, 1863
3.       Winchester Dalton Enlisted as a Private
4.       David Dickinson Enlisted as a 1st Lieutenant   Commission in Company D on June 22, 1861, Promoted to Full Captain on May 23, 1862
5.       James Dodd Enlisted as a Private-Died of Disease Company D September 18, 1862
6.       Leroy Dyer Enlisted as a 2nd Lieutenant Promoted to Full lst lieutenant on June 16, 1862
7.       David Dyer Enlisted as a Captain Promoted to Full Major on May 23, 1862 Promoted to Full Colonel on July 30, 1862, Resigned Company D on January 12, 1863
8.       James Hodnett  Promoted to Full Private (Reduced to ranks)  Enlisted as a Corporal on June 22, 1861 Discharged from Company D on September 5, 1862
9.       Thomas Jones Enlisted as a Corporal – Died of disease on July 29, 1864
10.   John Neal Enlisted as a Private – Died of disease on August 3, 1862 at Chesterfield, Va
11.   James Owen, Jr. Enlisted as a Private – Deserted from Company D on June 24, 1864
12.   James Owen Enlisted as a Private
13.   Coleman Payne Enlisted as a Private  Promoted to Full Sergeant on August 1, 1861, Died of Disease on November 22, 1862 at Pittsylvania County, Va.
14.   Frederick Payne Enlisted as a Private.  There was a description (red hair, hazel eyes, 6 feet tall) I believe that Coleman and Frederick were brothers.  I  found a Frederick and Coleman Payne in the 1860 census Pittsylvania County.
15.   Richard Payne Enlisted as a Private.  Description (5’8” blue eyes and brown hair)
16.   Giles Payne Enlisted as a Private. Discharged from Company D on November 27, 1861 at Richmond, Va.
17.   George Shelton Enlisted as a Private- Died Company D   October 27, 1863
18.   James Shelton Enlisted as a Private.  Deserted from Company D on May 26, 1863
19.   John Shelton Enlisted as a Private
20.   Thomas Shelton Enlisted as a Private.  Deserted from Company D on October 18, 1864
21.   George Thomas Enlisted as a Sergeant.  Description (Grey eyes, brown hair and 5’10”)


Of these 21 men, I found that two of the men died with no explanation.
Caleb Dalton died on August 10, 1863.  According to Regimental History, the 57th Regiment fought on July 15, 1863 at Williamsport, MD and on July 26, 1863 (area not given)
George Shelton died on October 27, 1863.  According to Regimental History, the 57th, there were no battles fought between July 26, 1863 and December 14, 1863. 
Four men died of disease:
James Dodd on September 18, 1862
Thomas Jones on July 29, 1864
John Neal on August 3, 1862
Coleman Payne on November 22, 1862
Two men deserted: 
James Shelton   May 26, 1863
James Owen Jr.  June 24, 1864

I do not have an explanation for why they traveled all the way to Louisa County, Virginia to enlist.  If anyone has any information on this subject, I would appreciate your contacting me.   I have given some thought that maybe Gumspring was the name for some small station in Pittsylvania County, but I can find no references.

 *I could not find Caleb Dalton in the census.  However this does not mean that he did not live in Pittsylvania County, Va.  His name could be spelled wrong or I could just have missed it.

I found most of my infomation at Ancestry.com.




Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery


Henry Chiles Ward served in the civil war. He was never married.

He was involved in an altercation with William Tardy. He killed William Tardy.
His mother, Elizabeth Mumford Adams Ward, sold land to help keep her son out of jail.
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Ward Adams Cemetery

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Ward Adams Cemetery


I just like this picture with Captain Robert Adams' marker in the forefront.
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Ward Adams Cemetery


Addison Ward was married to his cousin Wilmoth Walden Adams at the age of 19. He only had two children, laura Ward and Edwin Ward. Edwin died in the Civil War.
Addison was married three times.
Wilmoth Walden Ward
Mary Anthony
Fannie Steptoe Terry
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Ward Adams Cemetery




This is a continuing series of pictures of tombstones I located at the Ward/Adams Cemetery at Brights, Virginia near Leesville, lake
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Monday, July 12, 2010

Ward Adams Cemetery



Ward Adams Cemetery view from the road.
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July 13, 2010


View from the road of Ward Adams Cemetery in Brights, Virginia
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July 12, 2010

I hope everyone could at least see some of the information on the photos I sent out just now.  I am using one system, but I believe that I will have to start trying to find another.  Some of the grave markers were blurred. 

july 12, 2010

video

Friday, July 9, 2010

July 9, 2010

Attached are abstracts which I found at the Nashville Archives this week.  Hope this is helpful.


Amelia County, Va. Court Order Book 2
1746 -1751
Abstracted and Compiled by Gibson Jefferson McCannaughey   page 87
P.88-B  Court Held May 5, 1748  for trial of Sampson, Negro man slave belonging to Richard Woodson, accused of stealing a horse belonging to Walter Chiles.
P.89-A  Present Edward Booker, Richard Booker, John Nash, Thomas Tabb, Joseph Scott, Samuel Tarry &William Clement, Gent. Justices
(There are two pages of detailed information regarding the swearing in, etc. of the justices for this trial) (p.89-A) Clement Read, the King’s Attorney, gave the Court to understand that Sampson, a Negro man slave belonging to Richard Woodson of Amelia Co. entered the stable of Walter Chiles, Gent. “With force and arms” and stole one stone horse of the value of 20 pounds belonging to said Chiles.  Sampson plead not guilty and wanted a trial.  Thomas Nash, David Flournoy, Walter Chiles, Frank a Negro man belonging to John Nash, gent, and Pompey, a Negro man belonging to John Martin, witnesses, were examined, and Sampson was fully heard in his own defense.  Court ruled he was not guilty in such a manner as to take his life, but the Sheriff was to take him to the public whipping post and and lay 39 lashes on his bare back, and then deliver him to his master.

Will Book 1
Amelia County, Virginia
Wills 1735 – 1761
Bonds 1735 – 1754
Abstracted and Compiled by Gibson Jefferson McConnaughey
Page 13 of Abstract Book
40.  Chiles, Henry. D. June 27, 1746, p. Mar. 20, 1746 (sic). Wit. John Bostick, James Walker, William Chambers. Ex. Wife Ann Chiles, son Paul Chiles. Leg:lend wife Anne Childs(sic) 739 acres with plantation where I now dwell for her natural life; son Paul Chiles 400 acres in Albemarle Co., Va.  It being land and plantation where he now dwells; son Paul Childs (sic) 370 acres in Amelia Co. against where he now dwells, and 370 acres in Amelia Co. against where he now lives after my wife’s decease; son Henry Childs 340 acres in Albemarle (Note: think this should be Amelia Co., as Appomattox River is not in Albemarle Co.) lying on Appomattox River know by name of Hoopers low ground; son Henry Childs 448 acres in Amelia Co. lying on Appomattox River opposite the forementioned land known as the Island; son John Chiles 300 acres of land in Albemarle Co. (Note Amelia Co.?) on Appomattox River against my dwelling house; son John Chiles 369 acres and plantation where I now dwell after my wife’s decease; dau. Anna Chiles 250 acres which I purchase of Charles Hill N/S Staunton River which sd. 250 were cavited by John Twitty and he obtained an order of council for same, and Hill and Twitty assigned order to me in the Secretary’s office that a patent might issue out to me in my name; dau. Susanah Chiles 204 acres which I purchased of Isaac Allin in Lunenburg Co., S/S  StantonRiver, and one survey of land joining to lower end of aforesaid land to her; dau. Elisabeth Chiles 104 acres I purchased of William Echols, and one survey joining to it lying in Lunenburg Co., Va. S/S Staunton river; 265 acres on Holloday’s River in Albemarle Co., Va. And 300 acres N/S Stanton River in Lunenburg to be sold at discretion of my Ex. made over to me by Charles Hill; after just debts paid, remainder  of estate be equally div. between my wife and children to wit: Ann Chiles, Henry Chiles, John Chiles, Anna Chiles, Susannah Chiles, Elisabeth Chiles.  Slaves:  Negro woman Jeney, woman Sarah, boy Will, girl Weargrate, girl Bess, woman Lucy, woman Patty.

Page 14  
53. Henry Childs. Est. I&A r. May 19, 1749. Appr. Joel Watkins, Joseph Morton, James Walker. Ex. Anne Chiles.  Slaves: man Jack, man Daniel, women Tamer and Phillis. Value 258/5/9
Page 62
26. 1,000 pounds. Ann Chiles, Ex. for Henry Chiles, dec’d., with John Bostick and Wiliam Chamber; sec. March 20, 1746.

Thursday, July 8, 2010

July 8, 2010

These are copied copies of Saint Peter's Parish of New Kent County with references to Henry Childes.  I hope this is helpful.



THE VESTRY BOOK
of
Saint Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia
from
1682-1758
Transcribed for this web site by Anne Baker
HTML coding by Christine Wertin

THE VESTRY BOOK
of
Saint Peter's Parish, New Kent County, Virginia
from
1682-1758
Transcribed for this web site by Anne Baker
HTML coding by Christine Wertin


At a Vestry held for St. Peter's parish at the House of Capt. Joseph Foster.
PRESENT:
Capt. Joseph Foster, Mr. Thomas Smith, Maj’r Nicho meriwether, Mr. James Moss, Mr. David Craford, Capt. John Lyddall, Mr. John Parks, Mr. John Parks, Ju’r, Vestrymen. 
Mr. Wm. Bassett, Mr. Henry Wyatt, Chu’r wardens.

In Compliance with an order of Court dated the 28 Januery last, it is ordered that the Clerke forthwith send out orders to the Severall Inhabitants of this parish to prosession their Lands.
Whereas, Mr. John Alford and Mr. Will. major made Complaint to this vestry that they have never had their Lands prossessioned acording to Law, the orders being Lodged in the hands of Coll. John Lightfott, who never put the Same in Execution' Therefore, ordered that John wilson, John Lightfoot, Esq'r, Mr. Will. major, Mr. John Alford, Dan’ll Parks, Esq., and William Millington forthwith goe on prosessioning and reamark Each others’ bounds, and make returns of this order to the next vestry.
In Compliance with an order of the vestry of Blissland parish for prosessioning the bounds between this parish and the parish of Blissland, Capt. Joseph Foster, Mr. Thomas Smith, Mr. Hen’r Wyatt and Mr. John Park, Ju'r, or any two of them are re: quested to meet the Gen’t of Blissland parish at the House of Mrs Butts on the 16th of this instant, and prosession and reamark the bounds between the two parishes, and the Clerke is ordered to give a Copy of an order of vestry dated the 4 May, 1689, relating to the bounds between the S’d parishes to the Gen't apoynted.
Whereas, at a meeting of Certaine Gen't of the vestry of this parish at the House of Mr. Gideon Macon the 8th December, 1701 the power of Superavisers invested in the Church wardens for the time being it is, therefore, ordered that the power of Superavisers be still continued in the Said Church wardens.
Whereas, Mr. Gideon Macon, one of the vestry of this parish, is lately de cest, and Mr. John Lewis lately Departed this County, it is ordered that Mr. Henry Chilles be a vestryman in the place and stead of Mr. Gideon Macon, and Mr. Richard Littlepage be a vestryman in the place & stead of Mr. John Lewis, and the Clerke is ordered to Request them to meet at the next vestry.
Ordered that the Church wardens forthwith Send to Thomas Becket and Zackery Ellis or any other Bricklayers to Come and view the Bricks made by Thomas Jackson for the building a brick Church in this parish whither they are good and well burnt, fitt for building and that the viewers make Report thereof, and that the Church ,wardens pay them for their Trouble.
Rege'r p W. CLOPTON, Clk vest'r.
_________
At a vestry held for St. Peter's parish at the House of Mr. Hene. Wyatt, the 6 Aprill, 1702
PRESENT:
Mr. James Bowker, minister. 
Capt. Joseph Foster, Capt. John Lyddall, Maj. Nicho Meriwether, Mr. John Park, Mr. John Park, Jn’r. 
Mr. Hen’r Wyatt, Mr. Wm. Bassett, Church wardens.

Whereas, at a vestry held for this parish the 4 March last, the Clerke was ordered to Request Mr. Hen'r Chilles. and Mr. Rich'd Littlepage to be Vestrymen in the places of Mr. Gideon Macon, accordingly, and Mr. John Lewis and Mr. Hen'r Chilles haveing this day appeared and taken the oathes injoyned by act of Parlament to be taken in Stead of the oathes of allegiance and Supremesy together with the oath of a vestryman and Subscribed the test and assosiacion is admited into this vestry.
Mr. Henry Chilles aded.
It is ordered that Mr. James Moss and Maj. Nicholas Meriwether doe offiate as Church wardens for this Insuing year in the place and Stead of Mr. Wm. Bassett and Mr. Hene. Wyatt.
Whereas, there is a great Church of Brick a building in this parish, and the Churchwardens Liveing somewhat remote from the said building, therefore, Capt. John Foster and Capt. John Lyddall with the Churchwardens as Superavisers from time to time to give their direction and assistance for Carrying on the Said work.
Stephen Moon aploying himself to this vestry of help to Cleer the Roades in his precincts is ordered beside what he had formerly all the tithables at the quarters of Mr. John Page and Mr. Geo. Poindexter.
Whereas, Mr. Hene. Wyatt and Mr. Wm. Bassett, Late Church wardens, have bought of and Supose to have paid Excep about 6 mos., Maj’r Nicolas meriwether one of the present Church wardens, 30m, 6 25m 10’h 15m 20’h and 10m 4’d nails, the Said maj’r meriwether doeth promise to send (by the first oppertunity) the Said nailes to Robert Pasley’s Landing, and Thomas Jackson is ordered to bring them up to his House and deliver them to the workmen from time to time as they shall have need of them for and towards the Carrying on the Said building.
Reger’d p WM. CLOPTON, Clk vest’r
ew Kent County, Sct. At a vestry held for St. Peter's parish at the house of Mr. John Park, Ju'r, the 23rd Sept, 1702
PRESENT:
Mr. James Bowker, minister. 
Joseph Foster, John Lyddall, Nicho. Meriwether, James Moss, Hene. Chilles, David Craford, Wm. Bassett, Hene. Wyatt, John Park, John Park, Jun’r, Gen. Vestrymen.

At a vestry held for St. Peter's Parish at the house of Mr. James Moss the 27th day of febe’, 1702-3.
PRESENT:
Mr. James Bowker, minister. 
Capt. Jas. Foster, Mr. Hen’r Chilles, Mr. David Craford Mr. Will Bassett, Mr. Jno. Park, Jun’r, Vestrymen. 
Mr. James Moss, Mr. Nicho. meriwether, Chu’h wardens.

New Kent County. At a vestry .held for St. Peter's Parish at the Brick Church ye 27th Octo'r, 1703.
PRESENT:
Mr. Richard Squire, minister. 
Capt. Joseph Foster, Mr. Wm. Bassett, Mr. Jno. Parks, Capt. Richard Littlepage Mr. John Parks, Jun'r, Mr. Jno. Scott, Mr. Hen’r Chilles, Vestrymen.
Capt. James Moss, Maj’r Nicho. Meriwether, Churchwardens.

The vestry held for St. Peter's parish the 27 march, 1704.
PRESENT:
Mr. Richard Squire, minister; Joseph Foster, Wm. Bassett, John Parke Jun’r, David Crafford, John Parke, John Scott, Hene. Chiles, Gen’tmen vestrymen.
James Moss, Nicho. Meriwether Gent: Church wardens.

It
At a vestry held for St. Peter's Parish in New Kent County the 3 Aprill, 1704.
PRESENT:
Mr. Richard Squire, minister; Joseph Foster, Rich'd Littlepage, David Crafford, John Parke, Hene. Chiles, John Parke, Jun'r, Jno. Scott, Gent Vestrymen. 
James Moss, Nicho. Meriwether, Gent'n Church wardens.

This vestry taking into their serious Consideration the Largeness of this parish there being two Churches and one Chappell in the same, and the major part of the parish being desirous of a devision becase they Cannot have the word of God duly preached to them, doe accordingly agree upon a devision and that it begineth at the mouth of maddadecun Creeke so up the Said Creeke to Mr. Lewis mill, thence down the Queens high Roade to the rowling Roade that goeth from Edward mores to Geo'r Turners so along the Said Roade including the Said more in the upper parish, thence along the Said Roade to the Plantation of John Baughan Senr who is to be in the upper parish, thence upon a Line between the plantation of Nicholas Lawson and John Sandige the said Lawson to be in the Lower parish and Sandige in the upper and soe upon a Straite Line to Chickahamany Swamp including Edw Clark in the uper parish and Capt. James Moss and Maj'r Nicholas Merriwether Church wardens are Requested by this vestry to Suplicate his Excellence by way of Petition for his Concurrence with this order which if he be pleased to grant that the Lower parish may Continue the name of St. Peter and that his Excellence would be pleased to give a name to the upper parish as to his wisdom may seem meete and the Gleabe Lands w'ch are a at is 100 acres in the Lower parish to remaine to the Brick Church and 100 acres to remaine to the upper Church and what plate or ornaments in the parish to be Equally divided betwen both parishes and that which is Called by the name of the upper Church to be left in Good Repaire and that the Chapell to be finished all at the Cost of both parishes and Mr. Richard Squire was Requested by this vestry to declare what parish he would make Choice of (if his Excellence were pleased to admit of a Division who accordingly accepts) of the Lower parish.
New Kent County.
At a meeting Capt. Rich'd Littlepage, Capt. Jno. Scott, Jno. Lightfoot, Esq'r, Mr. Tho. Butts, Gen't in trust for St. Peter's Parish & Mr. David Craford, Maj'r Nicho. Merriwether, Mr. Henry Chiles. Capt. Rob't Allderson & Mr. Jno. Moss, Gen't in truste for Saint paul's pr'sh at ye Brick Church in St. Peter's pr'sh ye 29th Aug't, 1704.
St. Peter's pr'sh.
Dr.


To Mr. Rich'd Squire for 5 moneths, CC
6665


To CC for Do.
933


To Wm. Clopton, Clerk for 5 months
895


To Jno. Hilton Sexton for 5 months, I25 CC 10
135


To Idem for washing Surples
25


To Jno. Webb for 5 mo'th, 125 CC 10
135


To Idem for washing ye Surples
25


To Tho. Mimms for widdow faulkner, 5 mon'ths, CC
450


To Wm. Martin for Wm. Moore
270


To ye widdow Pyrant for five mo's
225


To Peter Plantine for Antho. Burrows, 5 mo's
450


To Sam'l Waddy for James Turner
540


To Jno. Kimbrow for 5 mo'hs
270


To Wm. Atkinson for 5 mo'hs
270


To Mrs. Roper for a bastard child
450


To Nicho. Mills for keeping a bastard child
403


To Maj'r Nicho. Merriwether ye ball. his acct
1447

1/2
To Sam'l Waddie his acct
700


To Joseph Baughn, Chain Carrier
30


To Jno. Landige ye Same
30


To Thos. Snead ye Same
30


To Rich'd Clark, Ju'r, for pleating ye Surveyor
100


To Jno. White's acct Regulated
180


To ye Church wardens of both pr'she for ye Trouble about ye division of ye parish
400


To Capt. Scott for Trouble about ye Survey'r
100


To Capt. Littlepage for paid Care foot ye Glazer L3-18s-6d at 1d p pound
949


To Convey for * * *
56


To Ja * * * aesd. Work
1190


* * *
166


* * * w Junr.
5*


To Capt. Robt. Anderson
45


To Thos. Jackson, his acct.
1179


To Coll. Joseph Foster, 500 6d nailes
20


To Idem p acct. more
140


To Mr. Geo. Poindexter's acct. Regulated L1 13s 9d, at 10 p C
338


To David Clarkson p acct.
140


To Mrs. Alice wiat ye Ball. her acct. p 20 lbs 10s at 10qd p cent
108


To Capt. James Moss his acct.
170


To Capt. Geo. Clough's acct.
163


To Vincent Vaughn's acct. 808 C.C. 113
921


To Wm. Clopton's acct.
2330


To Jno. Hilton's acct. keeping goody Ashle
380


To ye Collector for ye minister's Rent, 3 mos. 250 C.C. 35
285


To Wm. Clopton for Extreordinary Trouble about ye Devision, &c., 600, 100
700


To Jno Hilton's atendance here to Sall at 5 p Cent
1404


In all
29503


Cr



By 947 Tithables at 31 p polo is
29357


By ball. due to ye Colect'r
00146



29503







 


St Paul's pr'sh
Dr.



L- s- d


To ye half of ye Church plate & Table Cloath
2- 5- 0


To Ball. due St. Paul's parish
0- 5- 0



2-10- 0


Cr.



By halfe of Mr. Henry Wyatt Legacy
2-10- 0


Whereas we, the Subscribers, were apointed by both parishes to adjust & Settle all accts. between ye S'd parishes & having this day mett p'suant to ye Same, doe find ye pr'sh debt to amount to Twenty Nine Thou'd five hund'r & three pounds of Tobo. w'ch being divided by 947 ye Number of Tithables for this pr sent year amounts to 35 lbs. Tobo. p polo, Saving 146 lbs. Tobo. to be paid by both p'rish's to ye Colect'r next year, each Tithable in both ye S'd pr'shs for Derraying ye afores'd Charge upon ye division of ye plate & all other ornaments there is due to St. Paul's p'rishes five Shill's, & if there should happen to be any mistake or Error of either Side to be Equally Rectified.
John Lightfoot, Thos. Butts, Nicho. Meriwether, David Craford, Rich'd Littlepage, Jno. Scott, Henry Chiles, Robt. Anderson, jun'r, John Mask.

Also, I found a book called James City County  Keystone of the Commonwealth by Martha W. McCartney.  

On page 83 of this book is the following:

In 1641 Walter Chiles and Joseph Johnson of James City County and two other men secured official permission to explore the territory beyond the head of the Appomattox.  They were entitled to 14 years' profits from their discoveries, except for precious metals.  The assembly renewed the explorers license in 1643.